The End of America + Will McCarry (of Wylder) @ Jammin Java

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The End of America + Will McCarry (of Wylder) @ Jammin Java

The End of America
Philadelphia natives The End of America (TEOA) caught the attention of the industry and fans alike with their debut release Steep Bay (2010), following up with the sophomore LP Shakey (2012) and the critically acclaimed eponymous S/T album in 2016. TEOA’s new single “Break Away”, due out June 7, 2019 on all digital and streaming platforms, will also be available as a limited edition 7” vinyl and features a version of Simon and Garfunkel’s “America” on the B-side. “Break Away” is the first in a series of new songs that will be released by TEOA in 2019. TEOA is blazing new trails in the digital age by ditching the album format and releasing a new song each month for the remainder of 2019.

Will McCarry
Singer/songwriter Will McCarry first formed Wylder in Fredericksburg, VA in 2013. Drawing on a season of personal doubt and loss, Wylder’s long-awaited sophomore release, Golden Age Thinking, is an expansive and dynamic collection of rhythmic, haunting, and lyrically-driven indie-folk that examines the powerful influence of nostalgia as a form of denial.

Wednesday, Sept 4, 7:30pm
Jammin Java
227 Maple Ave E
Vienna, VA, 22180

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Jazz In The District

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Jazz In The District

by Michael J. West

Monday, September 2
Experimental jazz galore! Cinghiale is a saxophone duo from Chicago: Ken Vandermark (best known for leading the Vandermark Five, which once upon a time headlined this writer’s first ever free-jazz concert) and Mars Williams (best known for the NRG Ensemble). Both are freeform improvisation specialists. But both also have feet in the Chicago post-rock scene, and both Vandermark and Williams bring their compositional acumen to Cinghiale as well. So! It won’t be entirely free jazz, obviously… but it will be new, it will be different, and it will probably be weird, in the best sense. But that is not all. There are also two other artists on the bill. Often abrasive, always askew Chicago guitar improviser Steve Marquette (who has been known to work with both Vandermark and Williams in various contexts) is one of them. The other is the DMV’s own Sarah Hughes, the alto saxophonist who, if you don’t know about her by now, you simply haven’t been paying attention. Now’s the time to do something about that. The program begins at 8 p.m. at Rhizome, 6950 Maple Street NW. $15.

Thursday, September 5
It’s really been recently that trumpeter Muneer Nasser has been working the scene. (That, at least in part, is by design: he’s spent a great deal of time working instead on Upright Bass, the biography of his father, the prominent bebop bassist Jamil Nasser.) But since he has been playing out, he’s been making a splash. Nasser is also very much a bebop missionary, and he’s got incredible chops that with each new hearing demand yet another new hearing. He reminds this writer of Woody Shaw in his virtuoso devices and a little bit of his phrasing, but he’s got a gritty tone that I’ve never heard before. You can hear it on his wonderful 2019 album, A Soldier’s Story. A much better idea, however, would be to pick up that album from the very hand of the trumpeter himself, after you hear him playing with a superlative quintet that also includes tenor saxophonist Elijah Easton, pianist Christopher Stiles, bassist Gerhard Graml, and drummer Julian Berkowitz. They play at 8 and 10 p.m. at Twins Jazz, 1344 U Street NW. $10.

Saturday, September 7
There are those who would insist that Stanley Jordan is smooth jazz and not worth your time and trouble. This writer happens to think that that is true of smooth jazz in a general sense but adamantly denies that Stanley Jordan falls into that category. The innovative guitarist is best known for the tapping technique he developed in his playing. And while he undoubtedly has smooth contours in his sound, he is also more than capable of bringing out some rough edges. Indeed, Jordan’s current tour is what he calls “Stanley Plays Jimi,” an homage to the unchallenged god of electric guitar on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of his iconic Woodstock performance (August 18, 1969). Jordan says that it’s his fantasy of a modern-day, if-he-were-alive Jimi Hendrix concert. Consider that this is in a solo-guitar context, Jordan’s preferred milieu. Now, really…does that sound “smooth” to you? I thought not. It does sound pretty great, though. Stanley Jordan performs at 8 and 10 p.m. at Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Avenue NW. $35.

Sunday, September 8
There aren’t a whole lot of vibraphonists around these parts. Chuck Redd is the DMV’s elder statesman of the instrument; Warren Wolf is its reigning star. Chris Barrick is the exciting young player who will enthrall you with his prowess. Barrick is a D.C. native who spent some time in the Cincinnati area (where he went to music school) before coming back to build a career in his hometown. Recently he did exemplary work on trombonist Shannon Gunn’s 2019 album Gunn’s Ablazin’ and Abinnet Berhanu’s record Hebret Musica; as you might surmise, he is a popular choice for a sideman on bandstands all over town. Give him the lead of an ensemble, however, and he’s something else again. And when that ensemble features the likes of saxophonist Mike Cemprola, bassist Herman Burney, and drummer Eric Kennedy…well, need we really say more? Besides, you can check it out for yourself. The Chris Barrick Quartet performs at 6 p.m. at Alice’s Jazz and Cultural Society, 2813 Twelfth Street NE. $10.

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Michael J. West

Michael J. West is a freelance writer, editor, and jazz journalist who has been covering the Washington, D.C. jazz scene since 2009. He spends most days either hunkered down in the clubs or in his very big headphones. He lives in Washington with his wife and two children.

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Bobby Thompson Trio @ JV’s, Sat, Aug 31

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Bobby Thompson Trio @ JV’s, Sat, Aug 31

It’s been said that creativity takes courage, and self-expression is a way to show the world your inner soul. With a new group of songs and a new full-length album in the works, Bobby has let down his guard, and become more than the instrumentalist he gained a reputation for. He recently won a Wammie award (Washington Area Music Association) for best blues album, and although there are strong overtones of the blues in his writing, he sees himself now as a singer-songwriter, with a loud amp, and a strong band. He will as easily spend an evening entertaining a small listening room with his acoustic guitars and his songs, and the next night, he will have the dance floor packed grooving to the same songs with his band.

Saturday, Aug 27, at 8:30 PM
JV’s Restaurant
6666 Arlington Blvd, Falls Church, VA 22042

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Scott Kurt & Memphis 59 @ Port Tobacco, Sat, Aug, 31

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Scott Kurt & Memphis 59 @ Port Tobacco, Sat, Aug, 31

Southern by way of the Rust Belt, Scott Kurt’s unique brand of country music blends the old school outlaw grit with elements of guitar-driven rock. Influenced by artists like Eric Church, Jon Pardi, Luke Combs, and Tom Petty, Kurt strives for authenticity over perfection, vocally and melodically. The skillful storytelling behind his lyrics powered Kurt’s single “American Man” to the iTunes Country Top 40.

Saturday, August, 31, 2019 at 9:00 PM

Port Tobacco Marina
7536 Shirley Blvd, Port Tobacco, MD

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Matt Hutchison & the Big ‘Gin @ Avenue at Whitemarsh

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Matt Hutchison & the Big ‘Gin @ Avenue at Whitemarsh

Matt Hutchison is an unapologetic, pure pop offering. Always looking for ways to do more with less, Matt is endlessly searching for unique melodies and turns of phrase, weaving them into simple arrangements, the marriage of which delivers to his listener an accessible piece of art.  Much like the man himself, Matt Hutchison’s music is outwardly affable and charming. However, there really is more there than meets the eye (and ear). His music is an invitation into deep conversation over a bottle of the good stuff. He’d prefer cheap whiskey, but if it’s wet, he’ll drink it.

Friday, Aug 30, 7pm

The Avenue at White Marsh
8125 Honeygo Blvd.
Baltimore, MD

FREE All Ages

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The Frontier at Chapala

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The Frontier at Chapala

The Frontier is a polished indie-pop project emerging from the D.C. area that combines mainstream rock and indie flavors to make a unique sound of it’s own. Formed in 2016, the band has already garnered the likes of producer Austin Bello (Universal Records and Forever the Sickest Kids). Together they have released 2 ep’s along with 2 singles and amassed fans from all over the world just from digital releases alone. You can expect a lot more music as well as performances coming soon from the band. Follow the journey on their social media for updates and strap in for the ride.

Frontier has just released a brand new EP, Luminescence on June 28, 2019, which is currently available on their Bandcamp page (www.thefrontierband.bandcamp.com), along with two other EPs and a handful of singles.

Chapala Restaurant
15530 Old Columbia Pike
Burtonsville, MD
Friday, August 23rd
8:00 pm. 

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Jazz in the District this Week

Jazz in the District this Week

by Michael J. West

Wednesday, August 21
You know the name. There’s a good chance you know the sound. When Dexter Gordon said, “Jazz is an octopus—it takes what it can use,” he wasn’t talking specifically about Louis Prima but he might as well have been. One of the great New Orleans big band leaders, Prima encompassed everything from traditional jazz to rock & roll, and was one of the inventors of what we call jump blues. (That’s how you know the sound: Prima was the guy behind “Jump, Jive & Wail.”) His heir, when he died in 1978, was of course the then-13-year-old Louis Prima Jr., who—having been born in Las Vegas when his dad was working there—may have even more show business in his blood. Louis Prima Jr. and his 10-piece ensemble the Witnesses picked up where the elder Prima had left off, with high-octane, hard-swinging, jumping shouting blues-jazz-party music. Is it nostalgia? Maybe—but damn it sounds good. Not just in your ears, but in your feet. Louis Prima Jr. and the Witnesses perform (with free swing dance lessons thrown in!) at 8 p.m. at City Winery, 1350 Okie Street NE. $15-$22.

Friday, August 23
It’s the crisp flow of Roy Haynes that seems most apparent in the work of drummer Jack Kilby, who’s incredibly adroit and even more incredibly swinging. Now, take that assured but not-too-explosive touch and apply it to the meat-and-potatoes hard bop that Art Blakey made the primer of just about all modern jazz. The result is the sound of Jack Kilby and the Front Line, whose debut album Love Is A Song Anyone Can Sing was the winner of the most recent Wammy award for Best D.C. Jazz Album. If Kilby is not compared to Blakey as a drummer, it’s not because he’s incapable of that brand of thunder—it’s just that he prefers a more limber sound, albeit one with a tremendous deep pocket that rides dead center of the beat. (You could set your watch by his ride cymbal.) It’s a sound that taps into the lifeblood of Washington jazz tradition. Jack Kilby and the Front Line perform at 6 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 400 I Street SW. $5.

Saturday, August 24
Nicole Saphos first showed up several years ago as a working bassist on the scene, quickly gaining a reputation for her agile, soulful playing on the upright. The bass wasn’t vehicle enough for everything she wanted to put out there. Saphos thus has developed into a singer-songwriter of the highest degree. She cites Fiona Apple, in particular, as an influence on both her vocals and her composition (with Charles Mingus as the biggest factor on the bass). One can certainly hear elements of that, but ultimately it’s Saphos’ idiosyncrasies that are first and foremost in her music. This writer is particularly taken with her enigmatic original tune “Lady Hip’s Great Escape.” That said, she also remains a formidable bass player, and has a standby trio (with guitarist John Lee and drummer Ele Rubenstein) that is remarkable for its intuitive chemistry. One is hard put to find a better specimen of what CapitalBop’s Spotlight Residency is intended for. Nicole Saphos performs at 7:30 p.m. at Local 16, 1602 U Street NW. $5.

Sunday, August 25
The beauty of Cyrus Chestnut’s playing has many nuances, but it doesn’t take a deep dive into his work to know that. Especially not with his most recent release, Kaleidoscope (for which, full disclosure, I wrote the liner notes), on which the celebrated pianist went to great length to show that he was more than just the gospel-infused bop pianist of his reputation. He is that—but he also loves ballads and pop songs, and some R&B here and there, and a million other things. That depth, that variety, that “I contain multitudes” spirit is an important part of understanding Cyrus Chestnut. Even that, though, is not necessary to appreciate him. All you need is that beautiful, shining touch on the keys and unfailingly lyrical approach that you don’t even have to look for: it emanates from him at any given moment of a performance. Cyrus Chestnut performs at 8 and 10 p.m. at Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Avenue NW. $35.

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Michael J. West

Michael J. West is a freelance writer, editor, and jazz journalist who has been covering the Washington, D.C. jazz scene since 2009. He spends most days either hunkered down in the clubs or in his very big headphones. He lives in Washington with his wife and two children.

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Social Distortion Summer Tour

Social Distortion Summer Tour

Social Distortion is hitting the road with Flogging Molly, The Devil Makes Three and Le Butcherettes. Rehearsals have been fun and the show is going to be a barn burner… especially with this line-up. Tickets are moving fast, so don’t get left behind.

socialdistortion.com

Aug. 21 Baltimore, MD @ MECU Pavilion ticketmaster.com

Aug. 23 Virginia Beach, VA @ Veterans United Home Loans Amphitheater at Virginia Beach livenation.com

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Maryland Folk Metal Fest V

Maryland Folk Metal Fest V

Go see the fifth Maryland Folk Metal Festival at the Metro Gallery this Saturday.

Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 4:30 PM – 12:00 AM EDT

Metro Gallery
1700 N Charles St
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

facebook.com/MarylandFolkMetalFest

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Truehearts @ Gypsy Sally’s

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Truehearts @ Gypsy Sally’s

The Truehearts are a Nashville based Americana duo comprised of singer/songwriters Debra Buonaccorsi & Steve McWilliams. Their music is characterized by close harmonies and close ties to the roots of American country and folk music; rich with the sound of wood and steel and stories of the everyman. Their songs are melodic, expressive and muscular, ranging from melancholic ballads to boot-stomping rockabilly.

Headlining the night is Born Cross Eyed playing the music of the Grateful Dead. Also on the bill are Oxymorons delivering a blend of Rock, Blues, R&B, New Orleans Funk and Boogie.

Fri, August 16, 2019
Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm
Advance $12/ Day of Show $14+ fees

3401 K Street Northwest,
Water St NW,
Washington, DC 20007

ticketfly.com

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